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PHP is much better than you think

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PHP as it’s known today is actually the successor to a product named PHP/FI. Created in 1994 by Rasmus Lerdorf, the very first incarnation of PHP was a simple set of Common Gateway Interface (CGI) binaries written in the C programming language. Originally used for tracking visits to his online resume, he named the suite of scripts “Personal Home Page Tools,” more frequently referenced as “PHP Tools.” Over time, more functionality was desired, and Rasmus rewrote PHP Tools, producing a much larger and richer implementation. This new model was capable of database interaction and more, providing a framework upon which users could develop simple dynamic web applications such as guestbooks. In June of 1995   the source code for PHP Tools to the public, which allowed developers to use it as they saw fit.

Types of PHP

PHP 3 – PHP 3.0 was the first version that closely resembles PHP as it exists today. One of the biggest strengths of PHP 3.0 was its strong extensibility features. In addition to providing end users with a mature interface for multiple databases, protocols, and APIs, the ease of extending the language itself attracted dozens of developers who submitted a variety of modules. Arguably, this was the key to PHP 3.0’s tremendous success. Other key features introduced in PHP 3.0 included object-oriented programming support and a far more powerful and consistent language syntax.

In June, 1998, with many new developers from around the world joining the effort, PHP 3.0 was announced by the new PHP Development Team as the official successor to PHP/FI 2.0. Active development of PHP/FI 2.0, which had all-but ceased as of November of the previous year, was now officially ended.

PHP 4 – By the winter of 1998, shortly after PHP 3.0 was officially released, Andi Gutmans and Zeev Suraski had begun working on a rewrite of PHP’s core. The design goals were to improve performance of complex applications, and improve the modularity of PHP’s code base. Such applications were made possible by PHP 3.0’s new features and support for a wide variety of third party databases and APIs. In addition to the highly improved performance of this version, PHP 4.0 included other key features such as support for many more web servers, HTTP sessions, output buffering, more secure ways of handling user input and several new language constructs.

PHP 5 – PHP 5 was released in July 2004 after long development and several pre-releases. It is mainly driven by its core, the Zend Engine 2.0 with a new object model and dozens of other new features. PHP’s development team includes dozens of developers, as well as dozens others working on PHP-related and supporting projects, such as PEAR, PECL, and documentation, and an underlying network infrastructure of well over one-hundred individual web servers on six of the seven continents of the world. Though only an estimate based upon statistics from previous years, it is safe to presume PHP is now installed on tens or even perhaps hundreds of millions of domains around the world.

Functions of PHP 

php-functions Creating PHP Function – Its very easy to create your own PHP function. Suppose you want to create a PHP function which will simply write a simple message on your browser when you will call it. Following example creates a function called writeMessage() and then calls it just after creating it.

Functions with Parameters – PHP gives you option to pass your parameters inside a function. You can pass as many as parameters your like. These parameters work like variables inside your function.

Passing Arguments by Reference – It is possible to pass arguments to functions by reference. This means that a reference to the variable is manipulated by the function rather than a copy of the variable’s value. Any changes made to an argument in these cases will change the value of the original variable. You can pass an argument by reference by adding an ampersand to the variable name in either the function call or the function definition.

Retruning value – A function can return a value using the return  statement in conjunction with a value or object. return stops the execution of the function and sends the value back to the calling code.

Setting Default Values for Function Parameters – You can set a parameter to have a default value if the function’s caller doesn’t pass it.

Dynamic Function Calls – It is possible to assign function names as strings to variables and then treat these variables exactly as you would the function name itself.

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Article written by:

I am a student of Don bosco Technical College . I am taking IT course.

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